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  • Radiology in Public Focus

    June 01, 2013

    Press releases were sent to the medical news media for the following articles appearing in recent issues of Radiology.

    Thalamic Atrophy is Associated with Development of Clinically Definite Multiple Sclerosis

    Measurement of thalamic atrophy and increase in ventricular size in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is associated with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) development and should be used in addition to the assessment of new T2 and contrast agent-enhanced lesions, according to new research.

    Robert Zivadinov, M.D., Ph.D., of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, University at Buffalo, N.Y., and colleagues used contrast-enhanced MR imaging for initial assessment of 216 CIS patients. Follow-up scans were performed at six months, one year and two years. Over two years, 92 of 216 patients, or 42.6 percent, converted to clinically definite MS. Decreases in thalamic volume and increase in lateral ventricle volumes were the only MR imaging measures independently associated with the development of clinically definite MS.

    Development of thalamic and central atrophy is associated with conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) over two years, and measurement should be used in addition to the assessment of new CE lesions and T2 lesions, according to the authors. “Use of these MR imaging biomarkers may be relevant for identifying patients who are at high risk for conversion to CDMS in future clinical trials involving CIS patients,” the authors write.


    Media Coverage of RSNA

    Radiology May 2013 coverIn March, 1,175 RSNA-related news stories were tracked in the media. These stories reached an estimated 729 million people.

    Print coverage included The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, The Miami Herald and Orlando Sentinel.

    Broadcast coverage included Doctor Radio (Sirius XM), KFI-AM (Los Angeles), WLS-TV (Chicago), WMAQ-TV (Chicago), WHDH-TV (Boston), WXIA-TV (Atlanta), WPXI-TV (Pittsburgh) and KCBS-AM (San Francisco). Online coverage included The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, NPR.org, Yahoo! News, WebMD, iVillage and FOXNews.com.

    Read coverage of RSNA in these media:

    RadiologyInfo.org Wants to Connect with You

    Are you missing out on the latest radiology news or informative patient-friendly content focused on radiologic procedures? Then connect with RadiologyInfo.org on Facebook (Facebook.com/RadiologyInfo) and Twitter (Twitter.com/RadiologyInfo_). The sites offer one-stop access to the most up-to-date information about radiology and recent posts on RadiologyInfo.org.

    June Outreach Public Information Activities Focus on Men’s Health

    To highlight Men’s Health Month in June, RSNA is distributing new public service announcements (PSAs) focusing on abdominal aortic aneurysm (triple A), one of the leading causes of death for men over 55.

    In addition, the RSNA “60-Second Checkup” audio program will be distributed to nearly 100 radio stations across the U.S. June segments will focus on the use of PET/CT in the diagnosis of head and neck cancer.

    Fitted value intercept model of changes in lesion activity
    Fitted value intercept model of changes in lesion activity and lesion volume MR imaging measures by conversion status to clinically definite MS over time. P values were adjusted by using Benjamini-Hochberg correction to minimize for false discovery rate. A, Cumulative number of total new T2 lesions (P = .009). B, T2 lesion volume (P = .320). C, Cumulative number of newly enlarged T2 lesions (P = .01). D, Cumulative number of new CE lesions (P = .007). (Radiology 2013;268;2:InPress) ©RSNA, 2013. All rights reserved. Printed with permission.
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